The Emperor's Birthday, Japan

The Emperor's Birthday, Japan

The Emperor's Birthday, Japan

 

Celebration Date
23th December
Other Name
Tenchosetsu
Holiday Type
National Holiday

 

The Emperor's Birthday (Tenno tanjobi) is a national holiday in the Japanese calendar celebrated on the birthday of the reigning Emperor, which is currently 23 December, as Emperor Akihito was born on that day in 1933. Akihito is due to retire on 30 April 2019, meaning that the holiday will not be observed in 2019, and its next celebration will be on the birthday of Crown Prince Naruhito (23 February 2020). During the reign of Emperor Hirohito (Shōwa period, 1926–1989), the Emperor's birthday was observed on 29 April. That date remained a public holiday, posthumously renamed Greenery Day in 1989 and Showa Day in 2007. The birthday of the current emperor is always a national holiday. Thus, if the emperor changes, the national holiday will change to the birthday of the new emperor. Emperor
Akihito is the 125th emperor of Japan, and he has been the head of Japan’s monarchy since his father, Emperor Showa, passed away in 1989. He and his family primarily reside within the Tokyo Imperial Palace (known in Japanese as kokyo), which has been the main home of the royal family since the Meiji Restoration in 1868. 

 

History of the Emperor's Birthday

In 1948, the Emperor’s Birthday was established as a moveable national holiday, dependent on the incumbent emperor’s birth date. Japan’s emperor is considered a symbol of the state and of unity in Japan. The present emperor is named Akihito and was born in December 23, 1933. He is the 125th emperor of Japan and ascended to the throne in 1989. Akihito is the eldest son of late Emperor Showa. the historical dates may not be entirely accurate, it is a commonly accepted fact that emperors have reigned over Japan for more than 1500 years, and that they have all descended from the same imperial family.

Emperor's birthday, a public ceremony takes place at the Imperial Palace, where the gates of the palace are opened to public traffic (the Imperial Palace is usually off limits to the public). The Emperor, accompanied by the Empress, and several other members of the imperial family appear on a palace balcony to acknowledge the birthday congratulations of crowds of festive well-wishers waving tiny Japanese flags. Only on this occasion and on 2 January may the general public enter the inner grounds of the Imperial Palace. When the Emperor ceases his greeting, the crowd starts waving the flags again and the Imperial Family waves back.The postwar constitution of 1946 states that the emperor has only a symbolic function. He now mainly participates at ceremonies and diplomatic meetings, but has no effective political power.

  

 

 

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